Price-Fixing Claims

Price fixing is an anticompetitive practice involving a conspiracy between market leaders in an industry fix prices or raise them artificially.

Sometimes this results in consumers paying more for a product than they should. Sometimes the artificially priced product is sold higher up the chain of commerce, with expenses being passed onto consumers.

For example, one of our landmark cases, Chadha v. Bayer, involved a red dye that was used in the manufacture of bricks. Brick producers bought the artificially priced red dye in bulk, and the cost was allegedly passed on to house purchasers. This case was one of the first Competition Act cases in Canada.

Manipulating The Market

Price fixing can happen in any industry, from food to electronics to building materials. Our aim is to recover what you overpaid for products, much as we do in many telecommunications cases.

Rochon Genova's lawyers have expertise in the area of price fixing and have been lead counsel in important, precedent-setting cases. We will take on cases in which participants in a conspiracy:

  • Directly agree upon the prices themselves, increasing or maintaining them at high levels
  • Engage in market allocation
  • Reduce supply of the product, keeping it artificially rare
  • Agree not to invest in development of new products

In litigating these cases, we engage leading economists and other experts in the field to determine whether antitrust activity has occurred and identify who is responsible. We then determine the extent of the damages for the classes of direct and indirect purchasers — in other words, how much the price fixing has cost purchasers.

If price fixing has occurred, our lawyers will pursue a class action suit to certification and beyond.

Contact Rochon Genova LLP

If you suspect that you and other consumers have been overcharged by price-fixing activities, call Rochon Genova at 416-548-9874 or send us an email to set up a free consultation. We serve clients throughout the Greater Toronto Area, Ontario, and across Canada.